Sunday, November 16, 2014

U.S. House of Representatives to authorize the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. STOP running over our rights. STOP polluting the land. STOP violating the Lakota, the Indian Nation.

The Indian Nation is Sovereign Right? How can the United States FORCE this on land they don't own in any way. The Immigration issues today really point out that the Indians are the NATIVES. When does this end. When does Violating the Indian Nation, the Rights of the People End?

It Ends when YOU say it Does.

"ROSEBUD, SOUTH DAKOTA – In response to Friday’s vote in the U.S. House of Representatives to authorize the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, the Rosebud Sioux Tribal president announced that the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Sicangu Lakota Oyate) recognizes the authorization of the this pipeline as an “act of war.”

The Tribe has done its part to remain peaceful in its dealing with the United States in this matter, in spite of the fact that the Rosebud Sioux Tribe has yet to be properly consulted on the project, which would cross through tribal land, and the concerns brought to the Department of Interior and to the Department of State have yet to be addressed.

“THE HOUSE HAS NOW SIGNED OUR DEATH WARRANTS AND THE DEATH WARRANTS OF OUR CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN. THE ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE WILL NOT ALLOW THIS PIPELINE THROUGH OUR LANDS,” SAID PRESIDENT CYRIL SCOTT OF THE ROSEBUD SIOUX TRIBE.

“We are outraged at the lack of intergovernmental cooperation. We are a sovereign nation and we are not being treated as such. We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL. Authorizing Keystone XL is an act of war against our people.”

In February of this year, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and other members of the Great Sioux Nation adopted tribal resolutions opposing the Keystone XL project.

“The Lakota people have always been stewards of this land,” added President Scott. “We feel it is imperative that we provide safe and responsible alternative energy resources not only to tribal members but to non-tribal members as well. We need to stop focusing and investing in risky fossil fuel projects like TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline. We need to start remembering that the earth is our mother and stop polluting her and start taking steps to preserve the land, water, and our grandchildren’s future.”

The Rosebud Sioux Tribe, along with several other South Dakota Tribes, stand together in opposition to risky and dangerous fossil fuel projects like TransCanada’s Keystone XL. The proposed route of TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline crosses directly through Great Sioux Nation (Oceti Sakowin) Treaty lands as defined by both the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie Treaties and within the current exterior boundaries of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation."

Source
http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/rosebud-sioux-tribe-house-vote-favor-keystone-xl-pipeline-act-war/

Friday, November 14, 2014

The Unist'ot'en Camp Resistance; Freda Huson - Make a Stand and STOP the Oil Companies from Polluting our Waters, Destroying our Land. Stand with the Indian Nation. Make a stand for Mother Goddess Gaia.

Federal Government has NO Jurisdiction on Indian Land. The Native Americans will Save Mother Earth and us along with it; STAND with the Indian Nation.

Support the Unist'ot'en.

Please Spread the Word about these Folks.

Standing with the Unist'ot'en and doing what you can to help is something that we ALL need to do however we can to save the SOUL of Mother Earth.

Blog the Story, Send them Money, Go there, Make a Stand; Help in whatever way you can, even if it is simply prayer. This is massively Important to raise the vibration of Mother Earth and her people, water, land, animals, soils and air FOR US ALL.

United We Stand for Goddess Gaia; Mother Earth.

Whoever you are, wherever you are. 

"Over the past four years, the Unist'ot'en clan of the Wet’suwet’en nation have literally built a strategy to keep three proposed oil and gas pipelines from crossing their land. Concerned about the environmental damage a leak could cause on land they've never given up, they've constructed a protection camp to block pipeline companies. As opposition to the development of Alberta's tar sands and to fracking projects grows across Canada, with First Nations communities on the front lines, the Unist'ot'en camp is an example of resistance that everyone is watching. "




Solidarity with the Unist'ot'en


Links for more information and how you can help


http://unistotencamp.com/

http://unistotencamp.wordpress.com/who-we-are/

http://unistotencamp.com/?p=1021

http://unistotencamp.com/?cat=7

https://www.facebook.com/unistoten

Twitter
https://twitter.com/UnistotenCamp

http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/the-view-from-unistoten-a-camp-that-stands-firmly-in-the-path-of-enbridges-northern-gateway-pipeline

http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/unistoten-camp-evicted-a-fracked-gas-pipeline-crew-from-their-territories-985

http://aptn.ca/news/2014/03/13/unistoten-camp-resistance/

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Money Manifestation Secret #17 - "WHAT IF?" ~ Manifesting Abundance by Valerie Love

6 Kinds of Witches of MANY - Valerie Love; to Transform Self

What does "witch" mean to you? Modern Pagan Witchcraft

Christian Witch Reveals - What About Deut 18:10-11?

"Deuteronomy 18:10-11
New International Version (NIV)

10;  Let no one be found among you who sacrifices their son or daughter in the fire, who practices divination or sorcery, interprets omens, engages in witchcraft, 11 or casts spells, or who is a medium or spiritist or who consults the dead."



Dig Deep Folks, Find the Truth for yourself. 

Here is some more Bible research, Trust what feels TRUE to you. And DO NOT ever use any HOLY Scripture to persecute another. Sorcery, Witchcraft, Fortune Telling.. is it really Evil? Did not the Kings and leaders of the time go to them for help? Dig Deep Folks.
http://biblehub.com/deuteronomy/18-10.htm

Monday, November 10, 2014

"What is modern witchcraft, and why is a specifically feminist witchcraft needed?"

"Many people who consider themselves to be contemporary "witches" or "pagans" feel they are reviving a millennia-old spirituality. Some harken back to cultures that worshipped Goddesses as well as Gods, and were led by priestesses and wise elder women.

Others see their origins in paleolithic ceremonial magical groups. Some identify with "New Age" thinking; many do not use that label. It is generally believed that all witches are pagan (in worldview), but not all pagans are witches. (For more details, see Drawing Down the Moon, by Margot Adler, revised edition.)

As a religion, witchcraft focuses on working with nature, on psychic development and on direct personal relationships with Deity (Goddesses, or Goddess and God). It emphasizes balance, learning, and responsibility. As a pre-Christian, Goddess-oriented religion, witchcraft encourages female leadership, and many of its practioners are feminist or sympathetic to feminism.

Witchcraft is often called by its older Anglo-Saxon names: wicce or wicca. The Old English neutral plural for witches is wiccan, although some witches today say "wiccans." Although the masculine term wicca is most often used (which I consider symptomatic of the internal sexism of modern witchcraft), the Anglo-Saxon Old English term for the religion, and the term I use, is wiccecraeft.

A Real Wise Woman Challenges The Stereotypes and reveals the on-going persecution of "Witches"

Witchcraft is sometimes viewed as being "evil." This mentality fueled the witch-hunting inquisitions centuries ago, and is responsible for attacks against real witches and powerful women around the world today.

For instance, in 1985, three women in Zimbabwe were shot and killed by a group of men who accused them of being witches.

At least 20 women in West Bengal, India were killed as suspected witches in 1987. In 1989, women in eastern India were murdered after they were accused of being witches and casting "evil spells;" one of them was dragged from her hut, tied to a tree and slaughtered with an ax by two male neighbors, only one of whom was apprehended by police.

In 1990, in Venda - the nominally independent Black homeland set up by South Africa - an angry crowd set fire to an inhabited home, fatally burning two infants, because they believed the parents were involved in witchcraft.

By the late 1980s, witchcraft was a crime in several nations. In 1987, the West African nation of Benin declared that practicing witchcraft or magic was punishable by death or 10 to 20 years hard labor. The South American nation of Ecuador banned witches, fortune tellers and natural healers in 1989. Beginning in the mid-1980s, right-wing groups in the United States attacked "witchcraft" in an attempt to disrupt and control the public right to freedom of expression.

In 1985, parents' groups in at least 20 states, under the leadership of right-wing anti- feminist leader Phyllis Schlafly, demanded that public schools get parents' written permission for classroom discussions and curriculum material on a variety of topics, including witchcraft, abortion, social roles of men and women, homosexuality, human sexuality, and Eastern mysticism.

A lawsuit filed by one such group, Citizens Organized for Better Schools' (Mozart v. Hawkins County School System), charged that an elementary reading series published by Holt, Rinehart & Winston was teaching witchcraft, situation ethics, disrespect for parental authority, evolution and secular humanism.

More recent attacks have included Nathaniel Hawthorne's classic novel, The Scarlet Letter, for dealing with witchcraft and religion, and Frank Baum's timeless fantasy, The Wizard of Oz, for presenting a positive witch (Glinda the Good).

Also in 1985, newspaper and TV reports on child abuse and possible murder cases started using the terms "witchcraft," "occult," and "Satanism" almost interchangeably.

In August of that year, Rep. Robert Walker (R-PA) introduced an act to remove tax-exempt status from religious groups based on witchcraft, which indicated that a real witch hunt was developing. Then, Sen. Jesse Helms (R-NC), a powerful right- wing politician linked to ultrafundamentalist Christianity and censorship, got involved.

On The Issues Magazine: By the late 1980s, witchcraft was a crime in several nations.
Helms introduced Amendment 705 to the fiscal 1986 Treasury and Post Office appropriations bill, HR 3036 in September 1985. Helms' amendment, which specified, "No funds appropriated under this Act shall be used to grant, maintain, or allow tax exemption to any cult, organization, or other group that has as a purpose, or that has any interest in, the promoting of satanism or witchcraft," was passed by voice vote, without dissent or debate in the Senate. "Witchcraft" was defined by Helms as "the use of powers derived from evil spirits, the use of sorcery, or the use of supernatural powers with malicious intent."

Helms' amendment was meant to cut off tax and postal privileges for any group that he disfavored by fitting them within the vague definitions of the amendment. Both the American Civil Liberties Union (A.C.L.U.) and the Internal Revenue Service (I.R.S.) opposed the amendment, and the A.C.L.U. argued against the government's ability to define which religions are considered legitimate.

After a barrage of protests by witches and non-witches alike, the House-Senate conferees quietly dropped the amendment "on a technicality."

Historically, witch hunters have attacked not only unconventional religions, but independent, powerful, and publicly visible women.

A modern witch hunt of this type occurred recently in Beulah, North Dakota, when two men plotted to murder 61-year-old Karina Singer because neighbors thought she was a dangerous "witch."

This case was reminiscent of witch hunting over several centuries.

Karina Singer had lived in the area for %\ years. She and her husband John were farm owners who wanted to turn their farm into what Singer termed "a place of beauty and peace," where friends could visit for extended vacations.

In fall, 1989, the couple laid down two Native American "medicine wheels," or rock configurations, "for the healing of the land." John died of cancer the following April, but Karina continued the work. She had a guest house built and a pit burned in the yard.

When Singer had two other women visit the farm in the summer of 1990, she was unaware that rumors about her had been circulating for years. As Mercer County State's Attorney Alan Duppler later reported, "There have been rumors flying around Mercer County that these three ladies are witches and they're sacrificing animals and doing general cult type things."

According to the story, the guest house was a church, and visitors were seen dancing around a pit fire. (The "dancers" were apparently construction workers putting out grass fires started by sparks from the newly burned pit in the yard.)

When Jim Reppen, who worked for a tire service company, and Dean Unterseher, a farmer, heard the story, they "decided they were going to go down and eliminate the problem," says Duppler. Reppen and Unterseher, both armed, were arrested on Singer's farm in August and charged with conspiring to murder her.

"I'm stunned my neighbors could believe these things when we lived here 21 years," Singer said. "And instead of calling me to find out if they were true, they circulated them around until they became like an atomic blast mushrooming out of the prairie."

Karina Singer was an independent landowner, with different spiritual interests from those of her neighbors. She is one of many women - including feminist politicians - who are faced with modern-day witch hunting.

In reality, witchcraft is far from negative or evil. My definition of "witch" is a priestess or priest of wiccecraeft skilled in healing and psychic work and occult magic: A person able to bend or reshape universal energies, or an independent, uppity, powerful, or daring woman.

I define a "feminist" as a female or male who is female-centered or female-oriented; or a person who is not prejudiced against others because of their gender or sexual preferences; or anyone who, in a patriarchal society, works toward the political, economic, spiritual, sexual, and social equality of women.

Modern witchcraft includes a variety of denominations, or "traditions." The most feminist of these is the Dianic tradition, named for the Roman Goddess Diana, woodland Goddess of Freedom, huntress, and patroness of witches. One branch of Dianic witchcraft includes women and men as practitioners, and honors the God (of Nature, Love, etc.) as well as the Great Goddess.

Another branch is lesbian and separatist, refusing to acknowledge males either as practitioners or in the form of Diety (which may be considered reverse sexism).

Some witchcraft denominations often have female leaders and, to an extent, honor the Goddess. But others practice antiwomen sexism, and few witchcraft practitioners of any denomination are overtly involved in feminist issues (though a portion are in peace or ecology groups).

During the past two decades, American feminists have changed much of the outward look of witchcraft. There are more female leaders visible, and there is a great deal more emphasis on Goddess culture.

But, despite the long human heritage of Goddess worship around the world, and despite the reality that European witch hunts that lasted for centuries were primarily directed against women, contemporary witchcraft includes and accepts sexists, people who have conducted internal witch hunts, and other kinds of bigots.

And witchcraft too often tends to speak in male terms, to assume a greater importance for male deities and male spokespeople, and to assume antifeminist or antigay rights stances.

On The Issues Magazine: Witchcraft was defined by Jesse Helms as the use of powers derived from evil spirits.

Feminists involved in witchcraft have made a difference, however. The foundation of witchcraft is rooted in female power and female concerns. Much can be learned from feminist witchcraft that one can find useful as a feminist. Because Dianic witchcraft emphasizes the perception of universal creativity and energy as feminine, as the Goddess, women are thereby empowered as vital and important beings in the universe.

So, it becomes natural to assume that: Women are creative in all ways; women are leaders; women have a deciding voice in all that matters to them; women are responsible for their actions; women are able to communicate directly with Deity (or universal energy or Nature); and women have sexual freedom, reproductive rights, and the right to define their bodily lives.

Feminist witchcraft encourages the development of intuition as an effective part of human life. Each human being has intuition, an inner voice, a way of deciding quickly what is right or wrong for oneself, and what to do about it.

Western culture denies the intuitive judgment, and favors a rational, logical, statistical, or factual approach. Both intuition and logic are necessary for a well-balanced life. My intuition has helped me stay out of potentially dangerous situations, has led me to teach myself to meditate and to learn something about Yoga and T'ai Chi.

Feminist witchcraft also offers positive ways to view and change body images. Witches believe in self-blessings. Each of us is seen as being part of divine energy, of the Goddess and the God. And every part and process of the human body is considered sacred. So, one way to pray to the Goddess/God is to bless one's self and the basic parts of one's body.

As I have learned to trust myself and appreciate my body more, I have come to respect the functions of my body. In blessing my body, I learned that my flesh is really alive, composed of living cells that do respond to my needs.


I also learned to bless the coming and going of my monthly period of blood by honoring the Goddess in myself: "She who bleeds, yet does not die."

Feminist witchcraft focuses on the cyclical patterns of our lives: The moon, the sun, other stars, and the universe.

As I became more aware of my personal patterns, I grew more tolerant of my need for solitude, for writing, and for periods of fervent feminist political activity and meetings. I learned to balance more evenly the processes of giving and accepting love. And I learned to do something I thought impossible - to perceive the artist in myself. Cultural creativity - work educated to the Muses and Pan - is encouraged in feminist witchcraft.

Witches are very interested in herbal knowledge and in learning to heal oneself, others, even the earth. And many witches are in various kinds of healing professions or vocations.

Witches generally believe in reincarnation, in a cycle of life after life filled with learning. As I learned to see my life as one of a number of lifetimes, I also learned not to be afraid of death. I now see death as brother to the Goddess of Life and Love (as in the myth of Ishtar and the Lord of Death), or death as the sister-self of the Goddess-on-Earth (as in the Egyptian view of Nephthys below and Isis above, or the Greek views of Persephone
underground and Demeter aboveground).

The knowledge of healing methods can include not only ways to make life easier and healthier, but also ways to ease the passing of life into death. Sometimes death is a peaceful passage from one stage of existence to another. In 1970, my 30-year-old brother died of cancer.

I priestessed him - counseling him, sending him energy, advising him, sharing with him the psychic experiences that often occur to the dying person. I aided my brother to face death as a journey, neither frightening nor extraordinary.

I discovered that many Americans don't know how to deal with dying and death. Though many nurses are aware of the needs of a dying person and try hard to help, most of the doctors I contacted were unwilling or unable to deal personally with dying patients. The process of dying is made much more painful than it need be for many people in hospitals in this country.

When I perceive death as brother to the Goddess, I feel He is kind to Her daughters, and understanding, and helpful to all who need to pass on to her levels of being. When I personify death as sister to the Goddess, I feel she welcomes her children and renews us, readies us for rebirth, and helps us learn in harmony and peace. We are always moving from living towards dying and beyond, as trees and flowers in nature move through stages of existence and seeming (but only temporary) nonexistence.

Feminist witchcraft offers the feminist movement other helpful theological or philosophical perceptions of life: The process you use is as important as, or even more important than, your goal; balance is important in the ways we live; the energy you send out will return to you at least threefold (whether the energy is in thought or deed); learn to perceive the cycles of events (for example, the Equal Rights Amendment will not die, but efforts to place it into law go through cycles that wane and then wax forth); and human beings need the mystery and security of identifying with Mother Nature or Mother Earth.

Although modern witchcraft reflects some of the basic societal ills of our time, and although many witches today do not practice all they preach, there is much that feminist witchcraft offers to feminists and the feminist movement. If you are drawn to it, be careful and don't check your principles or your feminism at the gate. For those not so inclined, there is still much to be learned from witchcraft about ourselves and our place in nature."

Source
http://www.ontheissuesmagazine.com/1992summer/summer1992_Forfreedom.php

"Dianic Feminist Wicca/Witchcraft Tradition is woman and Goddess-centered denomination of the Neopagan “Old Religion.”

"Dianic Feminist Wicca/Witchcraft Tradition is woman and Goddess-centered denomination of the Neopagan “Old Religion.” 

The Dianic Tradition was founded by author, feminist activist and founder of the Women’s Spirituality Movement Zsuzsanna “Z” Emese Budapest in 1971, Venice Beach, California. (1)

On winter’s solstice in 1971, Z Budapest also established the first Dianic coven, called the Susan B. Anthony Coven Number One. (1) This coven still exists to this day, and has expanded its influences globally as well as virtually with an internet presence within Z Budapest’s Dianic Wicca University Online (2), a Goddess blog (3) and a monthly e-zine called Goddess.(4)

From 1971 to 1980, Z Budapest served as the founder and high priestess of the Susan B. Anthony Coven Number One, but in 1980 she made the decision to moved from Venice Beach in southern California to Oakland in northern California. The position of High Priestess of the Susan B. Anthony Coven Number One was ordained upon Ruth Barrett by Z Budapest.

Ruth soon renamed the coven to Moon Birch Grove, and then five years later renamed it again to Circle of Aradia; which still exists to this day. (5)

As perhaps the most world renown coven by name, the Susan B. Anthony Coven Number One was resurrected by Z Budapest in 2007 and now has a global presence as both a live and virtual coven offering a Dianic Wicca Clergy Priestess Training program. (6)

Prior to 1980, there were no ordinations within the Dianic Tradition. But after Z Budapest had ordained Ruth Barrett, she realized that there were other worthy women who were creating Dianic communities following in her example and practicing her teachings.

Z decided to establish what has come to be known as “Queendoms.” Between 1980 and 2009 (to-date), Z Budapest has granted thirteen such Queendom High Priestess ordinations. Queendoms require that every ten years, each High Priestess must train and ordain at least one other High Priestess. Failure to do so results in the High Priestess losing her “crown” and she is no longer recognized as an active High Priestess by the lineages associated with Z Budapest. Several of these women did allow their crowns to lapse.

What about the others who claim they are the true Dianic tradition?

Z met Morgan McFarland back when the Women's Spirituality Movement was young, during the trip Z and Helen Beardwoman took across the United States. McFarland was never crowned and never ordained by Z Budapest. At the time she met Z, she had an active all-female coven practicing together in the state of Texas, but according to Z McFarland's husband was there too. McFarland, according to Z, practiced a blend of Dianic and Gardnarian traditions.

Morgan McFarland, took the Dianic tradition to a place it was never meant to go when she began admitting men into her worship space and classes. In fact, Morgan McFarland went so far as to ordain her husband into her version of the Dianic tradition, thus creating the beginnings of controversy and issues of separatism. Morgan McFarland then promptly divorced her husband, but he continued to teach and propagate his own brand of Dianic philosophies. Thus, the Morgan McFarland Dianic tradition is not the same as the Z Budapest Dianic tradition.

The result of the creation of the McFarland Dianic tradition has been that the original Dianic tradition has had to redefine itself to distance itself from theMcFarlands. Thus, you will see reference to the Feminist Wicca, Feminist Dianic, Feminist Tradition and Feminist Witchcraft, which are all the same as Z Budapest’s women-centered, all female Dianic tradition.

There also exists another Dianic tradition which admits men, which was founded by Ann Forfreedom in Oakland, California. This tradition has no known lineage to Z Budapest's Dianic tradition. Not surprisingly, this version of Dianic tradition has also been inflamitory with regards to seperatism and lesbianism.

All of which bring us to the next topic, which is that the Dianic tradition is not and never has been seperatist nor solely for lesbians. What it has been is an all female women-centered theology that focuses solely on women's mysteries. The Dianic acknowledge the existence of men's mysteries and encourage the men to embrace them.

Z Budapest's Dianic tradition is very specific on this topic. She can be quoted as stating, "We always recognize, when we say "Goddess," that She is the Life-giver, the Life-sustainer. She is Mother Nature." (7)

"There are only two kinds of people in the world: mothers and their children. Mothers can give life to each other as well as to men, who are not able to do the same for themselves. This constitutes a dependency upon the Female Life Force for life renewed, and was accepted naturally in ancient times by our ancient forebearers as a sacred gift of the Goddess. 


In patriarchal times this sacred gift was turned against women, and used to force them to give up roles of independence and power." (8)

"Our sons, our Sacred Children, were not raised as traitors [reference to the word warlock], but as lovers of life, lovers of women, brothers or lovers to each other, helpers of the Goddess in the most essential skill of nurturing. Sons of the mothers in Goddess-worship became Kouretes, members of the Goddess-serving priesthood." (8)

Thus it was established by Z Budapest at the inception of the Dianic tradition, that there existed a counter-part all male tradition known as the Kouretes. 

The Dianic tradition does not espouse seperatism, instead it embraces the differences between the male and the female as given by the Goddess, Mother Nature.

Practicing Dianic Witchcraft does not preclude any woman from also participating with males under the auspicies of other traditions. 

The Dianic tradition simply stated, is a pure recognition of that which is all-female by those who are women-born-women within the sacredness of divine Goddess worship. Seperatism of any kind has no foundation within the original Dianic tradition as founded by Z Budapest.

1. Budapest, Zsuzsanna. The Holy Book of Women's Mysteries. Red Wheel/Weiser, 2007, page xvi.
2. Dianic Wicca University Online (http://wicca.dianic-wicca.com)
3. Goddess blog (http:// the-goddess.net/goddess)
4. Goddess magazine (http://issuu.com/zbudapest/docs/goddess)
5. Falcon River (2004) The Dianic Wiccan Tradition. From The Witches Voice. Retrieved 2009-07-05.
6. Susan B. Anthony Coven Number One (www.dianic-wicca.com)
7. Budapest, Zsuzsanna. The Holy Book of Women's Mysteries. Red Wheel/Weiser, 2007, page xvii.
8. Budapest, Zsuzsanna. The Holy Book of Women's Mysteries. Red Wheel/Weiser, 2007, page 183."

Source and Lot's more Great Goddess Information
http://dianic-wicca.com/dianic-wicca-tradition.html

Pentagram Pendants: Their Meanings And Synthesis

Portrait of a Witch with Zsuzsanna Budapest

Vicci Martinez - Come Along. "Make a Statement" "Take A Stand"

Dianic WITCHCRAFT: Summoning the FATES

As Goddess of Light, Diana became associated with the Germanic Goddess of Light, Lucia. In some places, the two Goddesses became interchageable.

The Susun Weed Show ~ Butter: The Super Food and Foods of Natives

Dianic Witchcraft - Women YOU too are God. Goddess Worship

Dianic Wicca ~ FOCUS on the Worship of the GODDESS and on Feminism.

"Dianic Wicca, also known as Dianic Witchcraft and Dianic Feminist Witchcraft,[1] is a tradition, or denomination, of the neopagan religion of Wicca. It was founded by Zsuzsanna Budapest in the United States in the 1970s, and is notable for its focus on the worship of the Goddess, and on feminism

It combines elements of British Traditional Wicca, Italian folk-magic recorded in Charles Leland's Aradia, feminist values, and ritual, folk magic, and healing practices Budapest learned from her mother."

"Most Dianic Wiccans as "positive path" practitioners do neither manipulative spellwork nor hexing because it goes against the Wiccan Rede; other Dianic witches (notably Zsuzsanna Budapest) do not consider hexing or binding of those who attack women to be wrong."

Source and Full Article
https://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Dianic_Wicca.html

Saturday, November 8, 2014

"Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period."

"The Search for Mrs. Bach

"Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period.

Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period.

In 2006, Martin Jarvis, a Welsh-born musician who teaches at Charles Darwin University, in Australia, aired a startling theory about Johann Sebastian Bach, the undisputed arch-magus of the Western classical tradition. Jarvis proposed that Bach’s six suites for solo cello—of which Pablo Casals once said, “They are the very essence of Bach, and Bach is the essence of music”—are, in fact, the work of Anna Magdalena Bach, the composer’s second wife.

In 2011, Jarvis elaborated his ideas in a book entitled “Written by Mrs Bach”; he is now presenting them in the form of a documentary film, also titled “Written by Mrs Bach.” Various publications, including the Washington Post, U.S.A Today, and the Web site Jezebel, have propagated Jarvis’s views. “Obviously, Bach is not a complete fraud,” Isha Aran wrote on Jezebel, conceding that Bach’s résumé remains an impressive one even without the cello suites.

This is not the first time that doubts have surfaced about famous works in the Bach catalogue. For example, the attribution of the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, which will reverberate in many a haunted house this Halloween, has been repeatedly questioned, with many scholars detecting features that are atypical of Bach’s style.

Nowhere else in his organ music does Bach make prominent use of octave doubling, as in the opening measures of the Toccata: it’s a showy, brazen gesture that suggests a quite different creative personality from the one who produced the St. Matthew Passion.

The formidable Bach scholar Christoph Wolff argues, however, that such flamboyance could be the product of a “youthful and unrestrained” composer—bad-boy Bach, as it were. The debate remains unresolved.

With that and other controversies in mind, I wanted to give Jarvis’s provocative thesis a fair hearing. Anna Magdalena Bach was a well-trained musician, a singer of substantial gifts who, as a 1790 source notes, gave up her career for the sake of her husband. She married him in 1721, when she was twenty, and bore him thirteen children, seven of whom died young. It may well be that she had influence on Bach’s later period; certainly, she served him assiduously as a copyist.

As the musicologist Yo Tomita points out, in some manuscripts the handwriting of husband and wife is intertwined, “in such a manner that they must surely have discussed something about the copies they were making together.”

There is, however, no evidence that Anna Magdalena composed music, nor that she studied a string instrument. How, then, did Jarvis become convinced that she wrote the cello suites?

He reports that when he was studying the works in his youth he had the nagging sense that they differed from other music by Bach. Later, he fixated on a phrase that appears in the lower-right-hand corner of the title page of Anna Magdalena’s copy of the suites, one of two principal manuscripts through which the pieces have come down to us. “Ecrite par Madame Bachen, Son Epouse,” it says. (The aigu accents are missing.) Here, Jarvis says, was the “coup de grâce of my prolonged and intensive research”: the phrase “literally translates as ‘Written by Mrs Bach, his wife’ –that is to say, composed by Anna Magdalena.”

This is suggestive stuff. But when you look at the manuscript itself you see something quite different. (There is a scan in the digital archive of the Staatsbibliothek Berlin.) The cello suites are found together with a copy of the Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin; the title page for the collection was written out by Georg Heinrich Ludwig Schwanberg, a Bach pupil. It says: “Pars 1. Violino Solo Senza Basso composée par Sr. Jean Seb. Bach. Pars 2. Violoncello Solo Senza Basso composée par Sr. J. S. Bach. Maitre de la Chapelle et Directeur de la Musique a Leipsic.” Only then, in the lower corner, do we see “ecrite par Madame Bachen.” The not insignificant detail that the cello suites are described as being “composed by Sr. J. S. Bach” is missing from Jarvis’s popular expositions of his theory, and, by extension, from the media coverage, which has tended to ignore Bach scholars and jump to sensational conclusions (“Bach Didn’t Write His Greatest Works”). Jarvis’s 2007 thesis is a bit more judicious, though still perplexing.

There is a further problem. If, as Jarvis proposes, “ecrite” really means “composed” (and, presumably, “composée” means something else), wouldn’t it follow that Anna Magdalena Bach should also be considered the true author of the Sonatas and Partitas?

The positioning of the text in the corner of the page suggests that it applies to both pieces. Yet, as Jarvis does not deny, a manuscript of the Sonatas and Partitas in Bach’s own hand exists. Indeed, Jarvis says that his doubts about the authorship of the cello suites arose when he perceived “vast differences” between these works and the ones for solo violin.

The suites didn’t strike him as “musically mature,” he said in one interview. In all, Jarvis’s reading of this title page is irrational in the extreme. Looked at upside down or sideways, it still says the same thing: the Sonatas and Partitas and the suites were composed by Bach and copied by his wife.


Jarvis went about his project with noble intentions. He declares, rightly, that women have been suffering for centuries under the misogynistic assumption that composition belongs exclusively to the male gender. He mentions the cases of Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Felix Mendelssohn’s sister, who exhibited considerable talent but was discouraged by her father and brother; and of Alma Schindler, who was ordered to stop writing music by her first husband, Gustav Mahler. Closer to our own time, the pianist Johana Harris played a crucial role in the development of Roy Harris, one of the leading American composers of the mid-twentieth century.

That said, no one is well served by wild speculation that distorts the historical record—or, for that matter, ascribes a piece of music to a woman on the grounds that it lacks maturity. And while classical music displays an excruciating gender imbalance—a recent study by Ricky O’Bannon found that 1.8 percent of works programmed by leading American orchestras in the 2014-15 season were by women—the most efficient way to address that imbalance would be to commit more resources to contemporary music.

As Amy Beth Kirsten has said, “Perhaps if we are going to fixate on equality in programming it should be to balance out the division between living composers and dead ones.” A classical-music world dominated by the past will, inevitably, be one dominated by men. Instead of trying to invent a female Bach in prior centuries, let’s seek her in the present."

Source
http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/case-mrs-bach

"Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period."

"The Search for Mrs. Bach

"Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period.

Johann Sebastian Bach’s second wife, Anna Magdalena, may have had an influence on his later period.

In 2006, Martin Jarvis, a Welsh-born musician who teaches at Charles Darwin University, in Australia, aired a startling theory about Johann Sebastian Bach, the undisputed arch-magus of the Western classical tradition. Jarvis proposed that Bach’s six suites for solo cello—of which Pablo Casals once said, “They are the very essence of Bach, and Bach is the essence of music”—are, in fact, the work of Anna Magdalena Bach, the composer’s second wife.

In 2011, Jarvis elaborated his ideas in a book entitled “Written by Mrs Bach”; he is now presenting them in the form of a documentary film, also titled “Written by Mrs Bach.” Various publications, including the Washington Post, U.S.A Today, and the Web site Jezebel, have propagated Jarvis’s views. “Obviously, Bach is not a complete fraud,” Isha Aran wrote on Jezebel, conceding that Bach’s résumé remains an impressive one even without the cello suites.

This is not the first time that doubts have surfaced about famous works in the Bach catalogue. For example, the attribution of the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, which will reverberate in many a haunted house this Halloween, has been repeatedly questioned, with many scholars detecting features that are atypical of Bach’s style.

Nowhere else in his organ music does Bach make prominent use of octave doubling, as in the opening measures of the Toccata: it’s a showy, brazen gesture that suggests a quite different creative personality from the one who produced the St. Matthew Passion.

The formidable Bach scholar Christoph Wolff argues, however, that such flamboyance could be the product of a “youthful and unrestrained” composer—bad-boy Bach, as it were. The debate remains unresolved.

With that and other controversies in mind, I wanted to give Jarvis’s provocative thesis a fair hearing. Anna Magdalena Bach was a well-trained musician, a singer of substantial gifts who, as a 1790 source notes, gave up her career for the sake of her husband. She married him in 1721, when she was twenty, and bore him thirteen children, seven of whom died young. It may well be that she had influence on Bach’s later period; certainly, she served him assiduously as a copyist.

As the musicologist Yo Tomita points out, in some manuscripts the handwriting of husband and wife is intertwined, “in such a manner that they must surely have discussed something about the copies they were making together.”

There is, however, no evidence that Anna Magdalena composed music, nor that she studied a string instrument. How, then, did Jarvis become convinced that she wrote the cello suites?

He reports that when he was studying the works in his youth he had the nagging sense that they differed from other music by Bach. Later, he fixated on a phrase that appears in the lower-right-hand corner of the title page of Anna Magdalena’s copy of the suites, one of two principal manuscripts through which the pieces have come down to us. “Ecrite par Madame Bachen, Son Epouse,” it says. (The aigu accents are missing.) Here, Jarvis says, was the “coup de grâce of my prolonged and intensive research”: the phrase “literally translates as ‘Written by Mrs Bach, his wife’ –that is to say, composed by Anna Magdalena.”

This is suggestive stuff. But when you look at the manuscript itself you see something quite different. (There is a scan in the digital archive of the Staatsbibliothek Berlin.) The cello suites are found together with a copy of the Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin; the title page for the collection was written out by Georg Heinrich Ludwig Schwanberg, a Bach pupil. It says: “Pars 1. Violino Solo Senza Basso composée par Sr. Jean Seb. Bach. Pars 2. Violoncello Solo Senza Basso composée par Sr. J. S. Bach. Maitre de la Chapelle et Directeur de la Musique a Leipsic.” Only then, in the lower corner, do we see “ecrite par Madame Bachen.” The not insignificant detail that the cello suites are described as being “composed by Sr. J. S. Bach” is missing from Jarvis’s popular expositions of his theory, and, by extension, from the media coverage, which has tended to ignore Bach scholars and jump to sensational conclusions (“Bach Didn’t Write His Greatest Works”). Jarvis’s 2007 thesis is a bit more judicious, though still perplexing.

There is a further problem. If, as Jarvis proposes, “ecrite” really means “composed” (and, presumably, “composée” means something else), wouldn’t it follow that Anna Magdalena Bach should also be considered the true author of the Sonatas and Partitas?

The positioning of the text in the corner of the page suggests that it applies to both pieces. Yet, as Jarvis does not deny, a manuscript of the Sonatas and Partitas in Bach’s own hand exists. Indeed, Jarvis says that his doubts about the authorship of the cello suites arose when he perceived “vast differences” between these works and the ones for solo violin.

The suites didn’t strike him as “musically mature,” he said in one interview. In all, Jarvis’s reading of this title page is irrational in the extreme. Looked at upside down or sideways, it still says the same thing: the Sonatas and Partitas and the suites were composed by Bach and copied by his wife.


Jarvis went about his project with noble intentions. He declares, rightly, that women have been suffering for centuries under the misogynistic assumption that composition belongs exclusively to the male gender. He mentions the cases of Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel, Felix Mendelssohn’s sister, who exhibited considerable talent but was discouraged by her father and brother; and of Alma Schindler, who was ordered to stop writing music by her first husband, Gustav Mahler. Closer to our own time, the pianist Johana Harris played a crucial role in the development of Roy Harris, one of the leading American composers of the mid-twentieth century.

That said, no one is well served by wild speculation that distorts the historical record—or, for that matter, ascribes a piece of music to a woman on the grounds that it lacks maturity. And while classical music displays an excruciating gender imbalance—a recent study by Ricky O’Bannon found that 1.8 percent of works programmed by leading American orchestras in the 2014-15 season were by women—the most efficient way to address that imbalance would be to commit more resources to contemporary music.

As Amy Beth Kirsten has said, “Perhaps if we are going to fixate on equality in programming it should be to balance out the division between living composers and dead ones.” A classical-music world dominated by the past will, inevitably, be one dominated by men. Instead of trying to invent a female Bach in prior centuries, let’s seek her in the present."

Source
http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/case-mrs-bach